Everything You Need to Know

State minimum car insurance refers to the legal insurance requirement in your state. Most states require some level of liability insurance, but the specific coverage amounts will vary from state to state.

What is State Minimum Car Insurance?

State minimum car insurance is the minimum amount of insurance coverage that is legally required by the state in which you live. The requirements will vary from state to state. The state minimum requirements will usually include the following:

  • Liability insurance: Liability covers any damages that you cause to another driver. Some degree of liability is a requirement in most states. Liability insurance is written with three numbers: the bodily injury coverage limit per person, coverage limit per accident, and limit of property damage coverage.
  • Uninsured/underinsured coverage: While only about half of the states in the U.S. require uninsured/underinsured coverage, it can be beneficial if you’re in an accident with an uninsured driver.
  • Personal injury protection (PIP): PIP coverage is only a requirement in about 20 percent of states, according to NerdWallet. It covers the medical costs of anyone injured in the accident, regardless of who is at fault.
  • Medical payments coverage: Medical payments coverage is another option for covering costly medical expenses following an accident. It is a requirement in Maine and Pennsylvania.

    While the minimum car insurance required by your state of residency will cover damages you cause to another driver, it will not cover your own. Additionally, it will not cover damages to your vehicle that are not from an accident, like a tree falling or theft. You will need full coverage for these types of events to be covered.

    Full coverage car insurance is a policy that includes the state’s minimum requirements, as well as collision and comprehensive. Additionally, if your state doesn’t already require PIP, then a full coverage policy would also include that. To ensure that you have enough coverage, it is always a good idea to check with your insurance representative.

    State Minimum Car Insurance Requirements

    Always check your state’s minimum car insurance requirements when buying a policy. These are the state minimum requirements, listed as bodily injury liability per person, per accident, and property damage coverage, as well as any additional requirements.

    • Alabama: 25/50/25
    • Alaska: 50/100/25
    • Arizona: 25/50/15
    • Arkansas: 25/50/25
    • California: 50/30/5
    • Colorado: 25/50/15
    • Connecticut: 25/50/25, $25,000 uninsured, and $50,000 underinsured coverage
    • Delaware: 25/50/10, $15,000 PIP per person, and $30,000 PIP per accident
    • Florida: Property damage liability of $10,000 per accident and $10,000 PIP coverage
    • Georgia: 25/50/25
    • Hawaii: 200/40/10 and $10,000 PIP
    • Idaho: 25/50/15
    • Illinois: 25/50/20, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, and $50,000 per accident
    • Indiana: 25/50/25
    • Iowa: 20/40/15
    • Kansas: 25/50/25, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, and $50,000 per accident
    • Kentucky: 25/50/25
    • Louisiana: 15/30/25
    • Maine: 50/100/25, $50,000 uninsured coverage per person, and $100,000 per accident, and $2000 medical payments
    • Maryland: 30/60/15, $30,000 uninsured coverage per person, $60,000 per accident, and $15,000 uninsured property
    • Massachusetts: 20/40/5, $20,000 uninsured coverage per person, and $40,000 per accident, and $8000 PIP coverage
    • Michigan: 50/100/10 property damage, and $250,000 PIP
    • Minnesota: 30/60/10, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident, and $40,000 PIP
    • Mississippi: 25/50/25
    • Missouri: 25/50/25, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, and $50,000 per accident
    • Montana: 25/50/20
    • Nebraska: 25/50/25, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, and $50,000 per accident
    • Nevada: 25/50/20
    • New Hampshire: 25/50/25, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident, $25,000 property damage, and $1000 medical, if you opt to buy insurance
    • New Jersey: 15/30/5, and $15,000 uninsured motorist
    • New Mexico: 25/50/10
    • New York: 25/50/50, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident, and $10,000 death liability, and $50,000 PIP
    • North Carolina: 30/60/25, $30,000 uninsured coverage per person, $60,000 per accident, and $25,000 property damages
    • North Dakota: 25/50/25, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident, and $30,000 PIP coverage
    • Ohio: 25/50/25
    • Oklahoma: 25/50/25
    • Oregon: 25/50/20, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident, and $15,000 PIP
    • Pennsylvania: 15/30/5, $5000 medical payments
    • Rhode Island: 25/50/25
    • South Carolina: 25/50/25, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident, and 25,000 property damage
    • South Dakota: 25/50/25, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, and $50,000 per accident
    • Tennessee: 25/50/15
    • Texas: 30/60/25
    • Utah: 25/65/15 and $3000 PIP
    • Vermont: 25/50/10, $50,000 uninsured coverage per person, $100,000 per accident, and $10,000 PIP
    • Virginia: 25/50/20, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident, and $20,000 property damage, if drivers choose to buy insurance
    • Washington: 25/50/10
    • Washington D.C.: 25/50/10, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident, and $5000 property damage
    • West Virginia: 25/50/25, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident, and $25,000 property damage
    • Wisconsin: 25/50/10, $25,000 uninsured coverage per person, $50,000 per accident
    • Wyoming: 25/50/20

      These coverages are the minimums for each state listed. If you have a lease or an auto loan, you may be required to have even more insurance coverage.

      How Much Coverage Do You Need?

      Depending on the value of your vehicle, the state’s minimum coverage may not be enough. According to ValuePenguin, they recommend at a minimum, a policy with:

      • $100,000 bodily injury coverage per person
      • $300,000 bodily injury coverage per accident
      • $50,000 property damage per accident

        It is always a good idea to evaluate your own insurance needs, considering things like how much it will cost to repair or replace your vehicle. Shop around to find a provider who offers you enough coverage.

        Is Car Insurance a Requirement in All States?

        While some type of insurance is recommended, it is not a requirement in all states. For example, New Hampshire drivers are not required to have car insurance. However, they are required to submit proof of financial means to cover any damages due to a car accident. Virginia drivers can also opt-out of insurance by paying a $500 annual fee. This isn’t usually recommended because it provides no coverage if you’re in an accident. You can likely find a minimum coverage policy around that price range.

        State minimum car insurance requirements differ from state to state, but it is important to know what type of coverage you need. It is also a good idea to consider additional coverage, which may offer you more protection.

        Check this out if you need additional information, resources, or guidance on car insurance.

        Sources:

        Minimum Car Insurance Required by your State

        Minimum Car Insurance Requirements

        Shop Car Insurance

        Best Full Coverage Car Insurance

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